Scott gets life for battering lover to death

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  • Keivon Scott is led into court (Photograph by Blaire Simmons)

    Keivon Scott is led into court (Photograph by Blaire Simmons)

  • Victim: Edmund Flood

    Victim: Edmund Flood


Just weeks before he was battered to death by his partner, Edmund John Flood told a friend: “I might not be alive much longer.”

The chilling comment in September last year came only a day before Keivon Scott viciously attacked Mr Flood and put him in hospital.

But Mr Flood, 55, later withdrew an assault complaint and explained he did not want to get Scott in any more trouble.

But less than a month later the well-known equestrian and harness pony racing driver was dead — the victim of another brutal beating at the hands of Scott.

Yesterday, Scott, 35, was jailed for life for murdering Mr Flood, who was also known as Johnny Five, and told he would spend a minimum of 18 years behind bars before he could be considered for parole.

Mr Flood was found dead in his Paget home on October 2 last year after his landlord became concerned about his welfare.

Supreme Court heard that Scott and Mr Flood had been involved in a romantic relationship.

Prosecutor Javone Rogers described the relationship as “strained and tumultuous” and one that was “fuelled by physical abuse, emotional abuse and fear”.

He described the murder as a “heinous” crime. “Mr Flood was beaten with an unknown object and repeatedly punched,” he said.

“We know with certainty that Mr Flood was bludgeoned, tied up and left for dead.

“The deceased’s ankles were tied to the leg of the bed, his arms across his chest and there was masking tape around his neck.

“The post mortem shows that he suffered repeated high-impact injuries to his head, face and neck, but his death was not instantaneous.”

Scott was arrested on October 8 last year and was found to have injuries to his hands and knuckles consistent with the attack on Mr Flood.

Scott pleaded guilty to Mr Flood’s murder in May.

Yesterday, he apologised for his actions to Mr Flood’s family, who were in the public gallery.

Scott said: “First and foremost I would like to say I offer no excuses for my actions.

“I accept what happened to John is wrong. My only wish now is to do the right thing.

“It is with great remorse that I am trying to do the right thing.”

Scott’s lawyer Mark Pettingill said that the attack had taken place while his client was in a “complete drugs haze”.

He added: “His problem has been drugs and dishonesty. The problem has been there for many years but he is not a violent man when drug free.”

Puisne Judge Carlisle Greaves said that Scott had assaulted Mr Flood before.

He added: “There are some aggravating factors in this case — this was not the first beating you imposed on the victim.

“The defendant delivered a beating on Mr Flood previously for which he was hospitalised. However, the victim later withdrew that complaint.

“Secondly, the defendant not only beat the victim but he left him tied up in the bedroom unable to secure help for himself and, in effect, he suffered to death.”

Police welcomed the sentence as a fair reflection of the crime.

Detective Sergeant Jason Smith said: “Unfortunately, this case speaks to the trend in our community of people resorting to beatings.

“We would urge the community to resolve conflict peacefully rather than resorting to violence that ultimately leads to tragedy.

“There are no winners in a case like this — this is a real tragedy and everyone loses.”

It is The Royal Gazette’s policy not to allow comments on stories regarding court cases. As we are legally liable for any slanderous or defamatory comments made on our website, this move is for our protection as well as that of our readers.

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