Was man fired ?because of his sexuality??

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Demonstrators who marched outside the House of Assembly a week ago have promised more action ? and claimed a case testing the law on discrimination in the workplace could be on the cards.

More than 300 protestors took part in the protest ? dubbed ?Lunch for Democracy? by organisers ? last Friday in response to MPs refusal to debate a bill which would have outlawed discrimination based on sexual orientation.


Demonstrators who marched outside the House of Assembly a week ago have promised more action ? and claimed a case testing the law on discrimination in the workplace could be on the cards.

More than 300 protestors took part in the protest ? dubbed ?Lunch for Democracy? by organisers ? last Friday in response to MPs refusal to debate a bill which would have outlawed discrimination based on sexual orientation.

Natasha Rosdol, one of the organisers, said yesterday: ?There are definitely going to be things happening in the future. There has to be.?

She said she was aware of ?one young man who believes he was fired on Friday and harassed on his job because of his sexuality?.

She added: ?He is considering putting himself forward as the test case that the Premier called for and could file his grievance as early as this week.?

She said the man?s details were not being made public at this stage.

Ms Rosdol told that those involved in last week?s rally were still ?debriefing? but promised that a long-term human rights campaign would be launched in the near future.

She said organisers were still collating the views of all MPs on the failed Human Rights Amendment Act 2006 so that ?all voters will know where their respective MPs stand, well in time for the next election?.

?Friday?s lunch was a success along several fronts,? she added.

?We established with our servants in the House that representation and accountability go hand in hand.

?We served notice, loudly and clearly, that the silent majority is no longer silent and we shall be vigilant in protecting our rights and improving democracy.?

MPs threw out the Human Rights Amendment Act, tabled as a private member?s bill by Government backbencher Renee Webb, on May 26.

Ms Webb said yesterday that she had spoken to the Speaker of the House, Stanley Lowe, about bringing the draft legislation back before the House this parliamentary session.

?He said ?you have to get the acquiescence of the members of Parliament. They would have to vote?. If they didn?t want to discuss it then there is no reason for me to think they want to discuss it now.?

She said she did not ask her party?s caucus meeting this week to consider backing her. ?I haven?t had any MPs say they have changed their opinion.?

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