6K walk on Sunday will highlight world's struggle to get water

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Residents are being asked to run or walk 6K from the Front Street Flagpole on Sunday to experience what it is like for people in developing countries who have to cover that distance every day simply to access drinking water.

Bermuda will be joining with 150 countries around the world to promote awareness of global water scarcity, with similar run/walks are staged around the world during a 24-hour period. The event is part of the Dow Live Earth Run For Water, which is being promoted as 'the largest global water initiative in history aimed at helping the world water crisis.'

Runners and walkers are being asked to cover 6K – just short of four miles – which represents the average walk undertaken by women and children to collect water each day in developing nations.


Residents are being asked to run or walk 6K from the Front Street Flagpole on Sunday to experience what it is like for people in developing countries who have to cover that distance every day simply to access drinking water.

Bermuda will be joining with 150 countries around the world to promote awareness of global water scarcity, with similar run/walks are staged around the world during a 24-hour period. The event is part of the Dow Live Earth Run For Water, which is being promoted as 'the largest global water initiative in history aimed at helping the world water crisis.'

Runners and walkers are being asked to cover 6K – just short of four miles – which represents the average walk undertaken by women and children to collect water each day in developing nations.

One of the organisers, Anthony Raynor said: "Most people do not realise the luxury we have of going to the closest faucet, usually on a few metres away, to get good water. "On Sunday we are getting people to walk or run so they can see for themselves what it is like to cover 6K for drinking water."

Live Earth was set up in partnership with former US Vice President Al Gore. On Sunday famous singers including John Legend and Estelle have been lined up to perform music at some of the larger city Run for Water events in the US.

Mr. Raynor said a group of people from the book ship Logos Hope were taking part in the Bermuda event. And those taking part would be able to go and visit the book ship after the run/walk as it is docked at Front Street. Proceeds from the Hamilton event will go towards the work of the newly established Bermuda Environmental Alliance, which has created short documentaries highlighting environmental issues and success stories in Bermuda, which are now being aired by Discovery Channel Canada.

BEA executive director Sangita Iyer, who will be participating in the run/walk, said: "Coming from India and having also lived in Africa I have personal reasons to be involved having seen water shortages and how people suffer.

"Bermuda is the only place in the world where it is the law that homes have to be built so that they can harvest rainwater, so the Island has much to teach the world."

The BEA is linking with the Live Earth website, thereby giving the Bermuda organisation and its environmental stories exposure to potentially millions of Internet users. Ms Iyer also hopes the BEA short documentary on rainwater roof collection in Bermuda will be shown in a Live Earth show across the US and other parts of the world.

Registration for the 6K can be made at Sportseller, in Washington Mall, or at the start line on Sunday. The cost to participate is $20. The event starts at 9 a.m.

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