Architect's show opens

Architects should always be artists, says debut exhibitor Alex Allardyce who opens at the Bermuda Society of Arts tonight.

His exhibit 'Hail to Bermuda' will be in Studio D of the City Hall gallery. The show, which is acrylics on canvas and wood, will feature topics ranging from flora to landscapes.

As a Scotsman, based in London, he found the Island's beauty something to draw upon and on his last visit to see his partner he took a host of photos and drew sketches and colour notes as a reminder.

  • <b>Artist and architect</b> Alex Allardyce is opening his debut show on island at the Bermuda Society of Arts this evening.

    Artist and architect Alex Allardyce is opening his debut show on island at the Bermuda Society of Arts this evening.

  • Photo by Glenn Tucker
Artist and architect Alex Allardyce is opening his debut show on island at the Bermuda Society of Arts this evening.

    Photo by Glenn Tucker Artist and architect Alex Allardyce is opening his debut show on island at the Bermuda Society of Arts this evening.


Architects should always be artists, says debut exhibitor Alex Allardyce who opens at the Bermuda Society of Arts tonight.

His exhibit 'Hail to Bermuda' will be in Studio D of the City Hall gallery. The show, which is acrylics on canvas and wood, will feature topics ranging from flora to landscapes.

As a Scotsman, based in London, he found the Island's beauty something to draw upon and on his last visit to see his partner he took a host of photos and drew sketches and colour notes as a reminder.

"What struck me was the colours of the buildings, the light, especially the late afternoon light and the roofs which are so sculptural," said Mr. Allardyce.

"It was just really nice things to paint and basically I took it on from that. And I was definitely painting more when I came to Bermuda because I would have more time to do it."

The 11 paintings are a combination of gardens, flowers and townscapes. "When you come to Bermuda you see the postcards and you see the standard views that everybody knows about, but I wanted to avoid them and find some more views and some stronger images of Bermuda to put out there.

"There are lots of really bright coloured houses all together and I must admit that I do prefer the parts where the houses are close together, because you get more subject matter. there is more colour to play with."

Mr. Allardyce, who studied both art and architecture at Edinburgh and Glasgow School of Art, added: "I have always been drawing and planning and designing buildings.

"It is just the creative thing, I've always enjoyed drawing whether it's in three dimensions or two, it is a massive privilege really to be able to do both."

Of his course, he said: "It was a funny course where you could just do everything, it wasn't one of those rigid courses.

"Some people thought it was a bit strange and thought 'architects couldn't be artists', but I think architects should always be artists. They are just making big sculptures."

Also opening at the BSoA is The Members' Fall Show, in the Onions Gallery, Influences by Ed Przelomski, in the Edinburgh Gallery, Déjà vu 1965 by Dany Pen, in Studio A and B, and Bermuda Above & Below by Jackie Stevenson and Sally Simons in Studio C.

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