Panoramic production: Ian takes scenic route in new book

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  • Shots from photographer Ian Macdonald-Smith's 'Hooked on the Rocks: Panoramic Bermuda' book. This is a picture of Bay Island, Bailey's Bay in Hamilton Parish.

    Shots from photographer Ian Macdonald-Smith's 'Hooked on the Rocks: Panoramic Bermuda' book. This is a picture of Bay Island, Bailey's Bay in Hamilton Parish.

  • Photographer Ian Macdonald-Smith has released a new photobook called 'Hooked on the Rocks: Panoramic Bermuda'. In it are scores of pictures of the Island's splendour, including Castle Island in St George's.

    Photographer Ian Macdonald-Smith has released a new photobook called 'Hooked on the Rocks: Panoramic Bermuda'. In it are scores of pictures of the Island's splendour, including Castle Island in St George's.

  • Warwick Long Bay

    Warwick Long Bay


Ever wanted to see panoramic views of the Island’s splendour, showcased all the way from Fort St Catherine in St George’s to the Maritime Museum in Dockyard?

A new coffee table book released by local photographer Ian Macdonald-Smith provides just that.

The seasoned professional has compiled a 144-page book called ‘Hooked on the Rocks: Panoramic Bermuda’ which is currently in stores Island-wide for $45. A mini version of the book was also published which can be easily transported by tourists and mailed away to friends and family living overseas; it is available for $25.

Mr Macdonald-Smith said he was determined not to repeat the same kinds of photographs shown in his five other collections with his latest book.

“It had been 21 years since my last scenic book and I really wanted it to be a reminder to everyone on the Island what a beautiful place we live on,” he said.

“I realised looking back at my panoramics [over the past ten years] I had a lot of the icons photographed and it really scanned the whole Island [I decided to put them into a book].”

Mr Macdonald-Smith was ten years old when his parents first gave him a Kodak instant camera to play around with. It wasn’t until his teenage years, when he got his hands on his father’s Cannon SLR, that he started diving into the craft more seriously.

“I picked up the camera [professionally] around 26 years ago and just started by making mistakes. I got feedback at that time from people who were interested and were buying prints and I was young enough that I decided I really wanted to give it a shot and if it didn’t work I would do something else.”

Though a photographer for his entire working life, Mr Macdonald-Smith said he’s always tried to view it as a hobby. “That keeps it fresh,” he explained.

He admitted it could be challenging finding new spots to photograph on the Island considering its size, but he frequently gets to explore “greener pastures” in the US and Europe via caravan.

Another challenge was getting the timing for the pictures right. He said the turquoise colour of the waters had to be captured at the right moment, as well as the right sunlight either in the early morning or late afternoon.

Mr Macdonald-Smith said he was releasing the book to show people a new and different side of Bermuda.

“We live one of the most extraordinary places on Earth and from my perspective I would like it to have universal appeal,” he said.

“Bermuda is notorious from the triangle and Bermuda shorts perspective and from a tourism and cost perspective. It’s obviously well known as one of the most expensive places on Earth to live and I certainly think there is an awful lot of misinformation as well.

“From a landscape perspective I wanted to be able to show people how it is. I wanted to show the paradox of Bermuda, for as much as it changes it doesn’t change [much as a whole].”

Shelley Bay today looks quite different than it did when Mr Macdonald-Smith snapped the shot pictured in his book; erosion caused by Hurricane Fabian in the Stonehall Bay, Warwick area has also changed part of that landscape.

The photographer said the book would also show some of the Island’s undiscovered treasures. He said there were some people who have lived on the Island for a majority of their lives, who haven’t fully explored the varied scenery.

“This is the other reason I have done the book,” Mr Macdonald-Smith said. “As Bermudians we usually live in our own little sphere of home, work, grocery store etc. Some people know New York better than their own Island and we are isolated on 21 square miles.

“When you show Bermudians their Island you actually open their eyes.”

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Published Nov 16, 2012 at 8:00 am (Updated Nov 15, 2012 at 6:01 pm)

Panoramic production: Ian takes scenic route in new book

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