Got goat’s milk? No kidding: It’s the perfect dairy substitute

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  • Gerry Wilmot has been selling goat's milk for the past three years and even got his wife Aletha singing its praises as an option for people with lactose intolerances. (File photo by Akil Simmons)

    Gerry Wilmot has been selling goat's milk for the past three years and even got his wife Aletha singing its praises as an option for people with lactose intolerances. (File photo by Akil Simmons)

  • Feeding Frenzy: A file photo taken of baby goats at Wilmot’s Farm. They are being fed with a tool that allows 13 milk bottles to be inserted from the back as it feeds through the front, enabling the goats to drink without any assistance. (Photo by Akil Simmons)

    Feeding Frenzy: A file photo taken of baby goats at Wilmot’s Farm. They are being fed with a tool that allows 13 milk bottles to be inserted from the back as it feeds through the front, enabling the goats to drink without any assistance. (Photo by Akil Simmons)

  • Feeding Frenzy: A file photo taken of baby goats at Wilmot’s Farm. They are being fed with a tool that allows 13 milk bottles to be inserted from the back as it feeds through the front, enabling the goats to drink without any assistance. (Photo by Akil Simmons)

    Feeding Frenzy: A file photo taken of baby goats at Wilmot’s Farm. They are being fed with a tool that allows 13 milk bottles to be inserted from the back as it feeds through the front, enabling the goats to drink without any assistance. (Photo by Akil Simmons)


Aletha Wilmot spent years searching for the perfect dairy substitute after she developed a lactose intolerance.

She first tried goat’s milk three years ago. It proved the perfect alternative.

“I was sceptical at first but I tried it and noticed it was similar to cow’s milk in taste,” Mrs Wilmot said. “If I were to put goat’s milk into a cow’s milk carton you wouldn’t know the difference.”

Her research found that goat’s milk was easier for the body to digest than cow’s milk and contained less lactose. Just as exciting for her was the fact that it was virtually allergen-free.

“I didn’t have the problems I had with regular cow’s milk, like stomach pain,” she said.

Goat’s milk is said to be an excellent source of calcium and contains vitamins A, B2 and B3 (riboflavin and niacin).

One cup of goat’s milk contains 8.7 grams of protein, approximately 18 percent of the recommended daily allowance. It’s also loaded with potassium, which helps regulate blood pressure and heart function, and one cup provides just under 15 percent of the daily value.

Goat’s milk can be used as a substitute for cow’s milk in cooking, but develops a tangy bite when heated or processed.

It’s often used in desserts as it adds creamy smoothness. Ice creams, fudges and other sweets also benefit from the rich texture of the milk.

Mrs Wilmot said she had never heard of goat’s milk as a child. It wasn’t until about 25 years ago she realised cow’s milk didn’t agree with her.

Strawberry or chocolate syrup can be added to goat’s milk to make it more flavourful, she said.

Mrs Wilmot said it was also a good option for children.

“Goat milk is as close to a perfect food as possible in nature,” she said. “It is a complete protein containing all the essential amino acids without the heavy fat content and catarrh-producing materials of cow's milk.

“After mother's milk, goat’s milk is the ideal food for weaning a child. It is the nearest to mother's milk in composition, nutrients and natural chemical properties. It is easy to digest and is a magnificent bodybuilding food.

“Its fat globules are one-ninth the size as cow's milk, making it easier to digest. If you don't homogenise cow's milk you must remove some of the cream [but] with goat’s milk this is not necessary as it is naturally homogenised.”

Mrs Wilmot’s husband Gerry, sells goat’s milk from his Warwick farm at MarketPlace stores, Lindo’s stores, Miles, Supermart and Harrington Hundreds.

Quinoa and goat’s cheese waffles

Serves 4 to 6

Ingredients

Waffle batter

2 ½ c goat’s milk

2 ¼ tsp dry yeast, not rapid rise

½ c unsalted butter, melted

2 large eggs, beaten

¾ c all purpose flour

½ c quinoa flour

¼ c cornstarch

1 tbs honey

1 tsp vanilla extract

1 tsp kosher salt

Directions

Make the waffle batter the night before by heating the goat milk on the stove until it is warm to the touch. You want to cut the chill out of the refrigerated milk, so watch the goat’s milk on the stove carefully and don’t overheat it. Dissolve the yeast and let it sit for five minutes.

In the meantime, beat the melted butter, eggs, honey and vanilla extract together in a medium mixing bowl. Once the yeasted goat’s milk has proofed, add it to the butter and eggs and beat together.

In a large mixing bowl add the flours, cornstarch and salt together. Using a balloon whisk, stir the dry ingredients together until uniform in colour. Add the wet ingredients to it and stir with a large spatula until incorporated. Cover with plastic wrap and put in the refrigerator overnight.

Pull the batter out of the fridge when ready to use and let it come to room temperature as you prep your Belgian waffle iron. Make the waffles as directed.

*The recipe can be paired with a cherry and maple syrup mixture, containing pitted fresh cherries, dried sour cherries and maple syrup.

Tomato and goat’s cheese sandwich

Serves 2

4 slices whole-grain bread

1 clove garlic

3 heirloom tomatoes, sliced thick

Herbed goat cheese (recipe below)

Extra-virgin olive oil

Flaky sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

Herbs for garnish (optional)

Directions

Toast bread until golden brown and crusty. Halve garlic clove and rub the cut side on top side of each toast. Spread toast with herbed goat cheese and layer tomatoes. Drizzle with oil and season with salt and pepper. Garnish with herbs.

Herbed goat cheese

3 oz soft goat cheese

Zest of one lemon

1 tbs minced chives

1 tbs minced basil

Coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper

Directions

Combine ingredients in a bowl and stir. Season to taste. Store leftovers in the fridge

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Published Apr 19, 2013 at 8:00 am (Updated Apr 18, 2013 at 6:22 pm)

Got goat’s milk? No kidding: It’s the perfect dairy substitute

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