Dill consecrated as new Bishop of Bermuda

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  • New role: Bishop Nicholas Dill poses for a photograph following his consecration at the Cathedral of the Most Holy Trinity last night. (Photo by Mark Tatem)

    New role: Bishop Nicholas Dill poses for a photograph following his consecration at the Cathedral of the Most Holy Trinity last night. (Photo by Mark Tatem)

  • Bishop Nicholas Dill greets the faithful outside of the Cathedral of the Most Holy Trinity following his consecration last night. (Photo by Mark Tatem)

    Bishop Nicholas Dill greets the faithful outside of the Cathedral of the Most Holy Trinity following his consecration last night. (Photo by Mark Tatem)

  • Bishop Nicholas Dill (left) is led from the west door of the Cathedral of the Most Holy Trinity by the Rt Rev Nicholas Baines, Bishop of Bradford, following his consecration last night. (Photo by Mark Tatem)

    Bishop Nicholas Dill (left) is led from the west door of the Cathedral of the Most Holy Trinity by the Rt Rev Nicholas Baines, Bishop of Bradford, following his consecration last night. (Photo by Mark Tatem)

  • Bishop Nicholas Dill (Photo by Mark Tatem)

    Bishop Nicholas Dill (Photo by Mark Tatem)


Bermuda’s new Anglican Bishop, 49-year-old Nick Dill comes to the post from a background of law and political science.
Born in Bermuda in 1963 to Nicky and Bitten Dill, the Rt Rev Dill has an older sister, Karin, and a younger brother, Patrick.
He studied at Saltus Grammar School until the age of 13 before attending the UK’s Oundle School, where he graduated in 1981 — and failed in Religious Education.
He sailed for a year on the tall ship SS Sorlandet before attending the University of Toronto’s Trinity College, obtaining a BA in politics and history.
After graduating in 1986, the once-sceptical Bishop Dill became a Christian after being inspired by his sister’s faith.
He obtained his law degree at London’s Queen Mary College, and undertook a pupillage at the chambers of Roger Henderson — also marrying Fiona Campbell in 1990.
Bishop Dill took a preaching course at the Cornhill Training Centre before returning to Bermuda in 1992.
He spent a year in the litigation department of Conyers Dill and Pearman before moving into private client work.
Attending Bible studies at Christ Church, Devonshire, Bishop Dill gradually moved away from law and into religion. Interviewed by then Bishop Bill Downs, he was subsequently sent to the UK for theological training and ordained as a deacon by Bishop Ewen Ratteray in 1997.
Bishop Dill spent four years as curate and then associate minister at All Saints Church in Lindfield. He returned to Bermuda in 2005, becoming head Minister for the Parish of Pembroke.
He was elected Bishop earlier this year over Archdeacon Andrew Doughty, and last night formally consecrated.
He and his wife have six children: Hannah, Samuel, Phoebe, Benjamin, Miriam and Rachael.
The family live currently in the Pembroke rectory but will move into the Bishop’s lodge.

Bermuda last night welcomed its newest Bishop as Nicholas Dill was consecrated in a ceremony at the Cathedral of the Most Holy Trinity.

Rt Rev Dill, who has served as the priest in charge of Pembroke Parish since 2005, was born in Bermuda and is the youngest ever to be elected to the post at the age of 49.

The Catheral was filled to capacity and there was standing room only for the ordination service, while many more lined Church Street to watch the procession from City Hall led by the North Village Band, which also consisted of representatives from many of the Island’s churches and denominations, as well as visiting clergy.

In a sign of solidarity with the young people of Bermuda, Bishop Dill was led by Senjae Vanderpool-Darrel and Jazajae Outerbridge, whose father recently died as a result of gun violence, both from the St Augustine’s area.

The consecration ceremony, which requires at least three other Bishops, was presided over by the Bishop of Bradford, the Rt Rev Nicholas Baines, on behalf of the newly appointed Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby. Those also involved in the consecration included the Bishop of Birkenhead, Rt Rev Keith Sinclair, the Bishop of Eastern Newfoundland and Labrador, Rt Rev Cyrus Pitman, and former Bishop of Bermuda, Ewen Ratteray, who had ordained Bishop Dill as a deacon.

Also in attendance were the Rev Dr Canon James Clark, who served as Bishop Dill’s training incumbent while a curate, and later as a senior minister when he was an associate, and Rev Stuart Silk, who worked with the new Bishop as a youth minister before going on for ordination.

The ceremony was opened with a welcome by Canon Residentiary and Sub-Dean, the Rev Canon Norman Lynus.

On behalf of Archbishop Justin, Bishop Baines read a letter which expressed the Archbishop’s sadness at not being able to attend the ceremony, but pledged his prayers for Bishop Dill.

“I’m delighted to send my warmest congratulations... Please be assured of my prayers on your behalf... I offer prayers and best wishes to your wife, Fiona, and your family.”

Readings of scripture were presented by Governor George Fergusson, Premier Craig Cannonier, the former Bishop Ratteray and Bishop Dill’s own son, Benjamin.

The sermon was also given by Bishop Baines, in which he explored the challenges undertaken by a shepherd within the church and challenged Bishop Dill in his new role as leader of the Anglican Diocese of Bermuda.

“The job of the Bishop is to keep reminding people of the big picture,” Bishop Baines said.

“Create the space in which people find, that, like Peter, God has already found them... [God] never calls without empowering us.”

He also challenged the Diocese as a whole: “Listen to Nick... Dare to believe that if Nick has been called by God, he has been called for a reason.”

Before the consecration and anointing, the mandate was read by Diocesan Registrar Sonia Grant, confirming the election, which took place on 2 February, 2013.

During the service, Bishop Baines blessed and anointed Bishop Dill and presented him with the gifts of Bishopric office, including a Bible, given by the Archbishop of Canterbury, a Bishop’s ring, a pectoral cross, a mitre and a shepherd’s staff, made and presented by Patrick and Nicholas Dill, Bishop Dill’s brother and father. The bishop was then installed at both the Episcopal Seat and the Dean’s stall.

The ceremony concluded with a full communion service, followed by the procession of clergy and church leaders from the church, culminating with the new Bishop proclaiming a blessing on the City of Hamilton and the Diocese of Bermuda.

At the conclusion, Bishop Dill meekishly smiled at all, greeting and thanking those who had assisted in the service, and warmly embracing both Premier Cannonier and former Bishop Ratteray.

Bishop Dill is supported by his wife, Fiona, and their six children who range in age from six to 21.

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Published May 30, 2013 at 8:00 am (Updated May 29, 2013 at 10:26 pm)

Dill consecrated as new Bishop of Bermuda

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