Young filmmakers keep it real

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  • FilmWinners

  • A man cleans a roof in the documentary Water Water, produced by Ethan Rogers and hosted by Krislyn Lambert

    A man cleans a roof in the documentary Water Water, produced by Ethan Rogers and hosted by Krislyn Lambert

  • Krislyn Lambert, the host of the film Water Water that was selected for the Reel Youth Film Festival in Canada

    Krislyn Lambert, the host of the film Water Water that was selected for the Reel Youth Film Festival in Canada

  • Ethan Rogers filming Water Water

    Ethan Rogers filming Water Water

  • An idyllic scene in the documentary Water Water

    An idyllic scene in the documentary Water Water

  • A water osmosis plant at Grotto Bay in Hamilton Parish shown in the documentary Water Water

    A water osmosis plant at Grotto Bay in Hamilton Parish shown in the documentary Water Water

  • Krislyn Lambert, host of the film Water Water, with producer Ethan Rogers

    Krislyn Lambert, host of the film Water Water, with producer Ethan Rogers


The world is getting a peek at a special aspect of Bermuda culture, courtesy of a pair of young filmmakers.

Ethan Rogers’ eight-minute film documents how residents here collect and store water.

Water Water came tops in a competition organised by the Bermuda National Gallery.

It will screen as part of the Reel Youth Film Festival tour, which showcases films by people under the age of 20.

“I wanted the film to teach the rest of the world something about Bermuda,” said 18-year-old Ethan. “I decided to teach them how Bermudians catch water for drinking and other uses.”

Water Water was chosen from 23 entries by about 70 students and adults as part of the BNG’s Youth Film Festival in December.

“The quality of entries was very high,” said BNG education officer Dany Pen. “The quality was at an international standard.”

Ethan said he never expected to win.

“I had stiff competition from another Bermudian filmmaker, Marquedelle Philip,” he said. “I guess every filmmaker sits back and looks at others and thinks, ‘wow, that is good’. I’d like to work with Marquedelle on a film.”

Marquedelle’s film, about obsessive compulsive behaviour, was called Drowning.

Krislyn Lambert was the film’s host and helped to select the music.

“Our film was more informative,” said the 19-year-old, who is studying nursing at Bermuda College because she loves to help people, but would also like to become an actress.

Ethan studies art and design at Bermuda College. He hopes to pursue film at the University of Central Lancashire, England, next year.

He began taking photos when he was five and was inspired to make movies by CedarBridge Academy teacher Ian Gallie.

“I took a course called Media and Communications,” he said. “Mr Gallie introduced me to film and I fell in love.”

Ethan’s film resume includes a boxing event for Bermuda CableVision.

“I am leaning more towards documentary, or even television series,” he said. “I am not that into fictional films. I like to show real things and show issues in my community; different things that are going on.”

He said his ideal documentary topic would be violence in Bermuda.

“It would be about everyday violence and negativity in the community,” he said. “I started a project on that and then realised that it could get me into touchy territory. In such as small community you have to watch what you put out there, especially when you are looking for a job.

“I am working with some friends to make a horror film, even though I don’t go for fiction.”

The teens said they both learned a lot about Bermuda from making the film, and thought it could be used to help to promote the Island.

“We had gorgeous sun the entire time we were shooting,” Ethan said. “When people abroad see Bermuda in the film, they are really going to say, ‘wow’.”

There were some challenges in making the film. Ethan confessed to having a broken a tripod just before they started, and he had to hold the camera throughout filming.

“At the airing at the BNG I was terrified that the audience would notice the camera shaking a little bit,” he said.

Krislyn said she found it difficult to learn her lines.

“I really enjoyed doing it,” she said. “Now I am looking out for more opportunities to act.”

Watch Water Water here: www.youtube.com/watch?v=bHCT8-kMWU0.

For more information about The Reel Youth Film Festival go to reelyouth.ca/RYFF.html.

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Published Jan 22, 2015 at 8:00 am (Updated Jan 21, 2015 at 8:29 pm)

Young filmmakers keep it real

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