Being thrown in at deep end suits aquarist

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  • Hands-on experience: Winston Godwin educates youngsters about marine life (Photograph supplied)

    Hands-on experience: Winston Godwin educates youngsters about marine life (Photograph supplied)

  • Up close and personal: Winston Godwin goes to work in the aquarium tank (Photograph supplied)

    Up close and personal: Winston Godwin goes to work in the aquarium tank (Photograph supplied)

  • Underwater world: Winston Godwin at work in the aquarium (Photograph supplied)

    Underwater world: Winston Godwin at work in the aquarium (Photograph supplied)

  • Making waves: Winston Godwin is responsible for all the seahorses and venomous tanks at the aquarium (Photograph supplied)

    Making waves: Winston Godwin is responsible for all the seahorses and venomous tanks at the aquarium (Photograph supplied)


A young Bermudian aquarist is making waves in some dangerous waters at the Ripley’s Aquarium of Canada.

Winston Godwin, who used to work at the Bermuda Aquarium, Museum and Zoo, moved to Toronto a year ago with the help of the Bermuda Zoological Society Steinhoff Scholarship for schooling.

Mr Godwin is now responsible for all the seahorses and venomous tanks at the aquarium. “It has been an amazing experience so far,” the 26-year-old said.

“We are all responsible for our own necropsies as well as for the treatments for various animals once we’ve consulted with the vet.

“We are also responsible for our own dosing procedures related to close system aquarium.”

Ripley’s Aquarium is home to 16,000 animals and 450 species from around the world.

Mr Godwin, who has been working as an aquarist for nearly two years, is one of 19 aquarists responsible for population.

He said: “Diving is also a fairly large part of the job here.

“Most of our disable tanks are cold water, approximately 45F-50F — needless to say semi-dry wetsuits and I have become great friends when diving exhibits like the Pacific kelp tank.”

Mr Godwin told The Royal Gazette he always had a passion for the ocean. “Growing up in Bermuda, its pretty impossible to not enjoy what the island has to offer. As a kid I always enjoyed poking around in tide pools, swimming and snorkelling. I remember a conversation I had with my dad when I was around 8. I had asked him, ‘Are there jobs that I can do with the ocean’.

“I really cannot thank my parents, BAMZ, BZS as well as BIOS enough for the opportunities they provided me. I was fortunate enough to be a Steinhoff Scholarship recipient as well, which allowed me to continue my studies at the University of Guelph.

“I can definitely see myself coming back and helping give back to an island and home that has given so much to me, especially when it comes to education, the environment and conservation.”

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Published Feb 8, 2016 at 8:00 am (Updated Feb 8, 2016 at 6:19 am)

Being thrown in at deep end suits aquarist

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