Think-tank: education on water system needed

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  • Tarik Smith, founder of Koom Consulting (Photograph provided)

    Tarik Smith, founder of Koom Consulting (Photograph provided)


Better education on Bermuda’s water tank system could help to reduce health risks, according to a recent study.

A government spokeswoman said the study found there were “striking differences” in awareness of Bermuda’s rainwater harvesting system.

It also found a large percentage of Bermuda residents were either “totally oblivious” of the system or took it for granted.

The study was led by Koom Consulting, a private water engineering and project management consultancy founded by Bermudian Tarik Smith.

Mr Smith said: “There appears to be a significant imbalance between the wealth of information available on good water-management practices in Bermuda and the percentage of the local population that is aware of and apply such practices.

“Through a collective effort of research, capacity-building and outreach, sustainable water management could once again become an integral part of our culture.”

David Kendell, the director of the Department of Health said: “The collection of water is central to virtually every residence in Bermuda and the importance of regular tank maintenance and the conservation of uncontaminated water is vital to public health.

“This study has highlighted the need to educate younger people who perhaps are not as aware of the responsibilities involved in optimising our unique water collection systems.”

The study also identified the need for further research to gauge public awareness of tank water as “raw water”, the potential effects of contamination and the potential impact of climate change.

The study was launched after a public lecture on water management at Bermuda College as part of Corange Science Week.

The interest in the lecture inspired a new course, called Drinking Water Quality Control, which will be offered at the college in June and October.

Tammy Richardson, the dean of arts and science at the college, said: “This project is a direct result of the feedback received from many sectors following the public forum.

“I am excited that, under Mr Smith’s leadership, productive work has continued and expanded beyond Corange Science Week.”

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Published Feb 27, 2018 at 8:00 am (Updated Feb 27, 2018 at 7:28 am)

Think-tank: education on water system needed

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