Brave Davon stares down his fear as a nurse

  • The patient could be family: Bermudian Davon Adams

    The patient could be family: Bermudian Davon Adams

  • Full body protection: Bermudian Davon Adams is a nurse in a level-one trauma centre in Washington (Photograph provided)

    Full body protection: Bermudian Davon Adams is a nurse in a level-one trauma centre in Washington (Photograph provided)


A hero Bermudian nurse in the front line of the Covid-19 pandemic in America said he fought down his own fear to keep on treating the patients in his care.

Davon Adams, a nurse in a level-one trauma centre in Washington, admitted he “would be lying if I said that nurses weren’t scared”.

Mr Adams said: “Every time I put on the personal protective equipment and walk into that patient’s room, I think to myself ‘is this the time when I contract the virus?’”

However, he added: “Those thoughts quickly fade as I walk in the room and see my patient in the bed. I am there to do everything I can to help heal that person.”

Mr Adams said: “They didn’t ask to become sick, nor did they ask to be in the hospital, but I will try my best to help heal them and get them back to their loved ones.

“I treat all my patients with dignity and respect because who knows?

“I could be the patient in the bed one day and would hope one of my fellow nurses are willing to put themselves at risk, to take care of me, just like I take care of others.”

He added: “Nursing is a selfless profession. Oftentimes we put our patients needs above our own.”

Mr Adams said the human cost of the virus struck home after he watched his first Covid-19 patient die, despite an all-out effort by medical staff.

He added: “Prior to that, the death toll was just some numbers we had all seen on TV — however, when this patient died in the ICU, it really hit close to home.

“This is someone’s loved one. That could be my family member.”

Mr Adams said he was not at first worried about the virus when it surface in China last December.

He explained: “It was business as usual at my hospital and almost every hospital in the area.

“However, as the weeks continued to pass and more and more news outlets began to report on the story, there was some talk among healthcare professionals.

“But some of us didn’t think it was a big deal.”

Mr Adams admitted: “Perhaps we were a little naïve when it first began to spread in China as I remember having conversations with co-workers and people who said that could never happen here.”

He said his hospital began to take precautions before the virus reached the city and he was surprised when the hospital’s first case was confirmed.

Mr Adams said: “I was caught a little off guard. I didn’t think it would’ve reached the area as fast as it did.

“That being said, I felt prepared and was comforted by the fact that we had kept up-to-date with all the latest information.”

He said staff at the hospital had been screened, and when they entered the building they were assessed for symptoms and their temperatures were checked.

Mr Adams added: “Our hours are the same, we are required to work three 12 hour shifts a week.

“What has changed is ... these Covid-19 positive patients are declining quickly and needing a lot of medical care.

“What we have found is these patients are doing ‘okay’ all things considered, but take a turn for the worse requiring extensive medical care.”

He said his hospital had enough medical supplies, but that he was worried if the situation would deteriorate if the pandemic continued for an extended time.

Mr Adams continued: “Currently, we are reusing special N95 masks and surgical masks, to ensure we have an adequate supply.

Mr Adams added: “I will say my hospital has been great on keeping the staff up-to-date on all things related to Covid-19, as it is constantly changing.”

He pleaded with Bermudians to stay at home to cut the risk of the spread of the coronavirus.

Mr Adams added: “It may be boring, it may not be fun, but it is so important for the health and safety of others.

“I’d also encourage people to wash their hands and practice good hygiene when coughing and sneezing.”

He said that the public should also be wary of misinformation spread on social media and that people should rely on trusted news stories.

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Published Mar 28, 2020 at 8:00 am (Updated Mar 28, 2020 at 8:00 am)

Brave Davon stares down his fear as a nurse

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