Youngsters get creative at Masterworks

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  • Masterworks Museum of Bermuda Art summer camp students stand in front of the Lady K. Fever mural (Photograph supplied)

    Masterworks Museum of Bermuda Art summer camp students stand in front of the Lady K. Fever mural (Photograph supplied)


Around 300 children got the chance to hone their creative skills at the Masterworks Museum of Bermuda Art this summer.

Masterworks said at least 30 of the placements on the eight-week camp were a result of donations from the public.

Tom Butterfield, founder and creative director of Masterworks, stated: “The more money we raise, the more we can put into education programmes.

“It’s about the process of inclusion and the contributions are coming in and being specifically allocated to bursaries on request by the donors.”

In June, the owner of the superyacht Maltese Falcon donated $50,000 and organised a silent auction on board to raise funds.

Mr Butterfield said: “It was the wish of the owner of the Maltese Falcon that some of the funds that were raised were used in a bursary capacity.”

Art enthusiast and supporter of Bermuda arts John Charman, who contributes the prize money for the biennial Charman Prize, provided the camp students with shirts to protect their clothes while they explored different forms of art.

Students also worked alongside Canadian graffiti artist Lady K. Fever when she visited to refurbish her 2011 mural.

Mr Butterfield said: “Our education programmes are important for a number of reasons but mostly they debunk the myth that museums don’t have the heart or the capacity to think of others with financial challenges that would have them excluded, and also allows for children to be educated about art in a less structured and more creative way.

“Art education is important in many ways because it teaches children about thinking for themselves and challenges their minds, especially young minds.”

The museum runs education programmes throughout the year, including the popular Super Saturday, a free monthly event due to restart at the end of this month. Children of all ages walk through the galleries and take part in craft activities.

Mr Butterfield said a perception persisted that art galleries were detached from the public.

But he added that “museums are making every engagement they can and it’s just a matter of getting the word out”. He added: “We’re not just throwing money away. This is a matter of donors realising the benefit of having inclusiveness and they are wanting the money to go towards these programmes and giving everyone the opportunity to participate.”

For more information about Masterworks education programmes, e-mail edumworks@logic.bm or call 299-4000

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Published Sep 19, 2017 at 8:00 am (Updated Sep 19, 2017 at 6:54 am)

Youngsters get creative at Masterworks

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