Harbour Light gets in the mood for Good Friday

  • Maintaining tradition: Naomi Fox, left, Captain Wendy Crabb and Chandra-Lee Bascome examine a kite created by a client of the Salvation Army’s Harbour Light programme for its Easter kite sale (Photograph by Akil Simmons)

    Maintaining tradition: Naomi Fox, left, Captain Wendy Crabb and Chandra-Lee Bascome examine a kite created by a client of the Salvation Army’s Harbour Light programme for its Easter kite sale (Photograph by Akil Simmons)

  • Therapy room: the Salvation Army’s Harbour Light facility is holding its annual kite (Photograph by Akil Simmons)

    Therapy room: the Salvation Army’s Harbour Light facility is holding its annual kite (Photograph by Akil Simmons)

  • Somerset colours: Salvation Army Captain Wendy Crabb shows off a kite (Photograph by Akil Simmons)

    Somerset colours: Salvation Army Captain Wendy Crabb shows off a kite (Photograph by Akil Simmons)


Kites made by Salvation Army clients are up for sale.

The traditional-style Bermuda kites, created at the Salvation Army’s Harbour Light centre, were made as part of the rehabilitation programme run by the charity.

Naomi Fox, in charge of marketing and sale of the kites, said: “It is a part of their therapy and helps them to build their confidence and self-esteem.”

“It’s exciting to see someone who started making a kite and couldn’t do it in the beginning, but at the end of the project they are able to frame, design and paste the kite.”

The money raised from kite sales will be used for other therapeutic activities for the clients.

Frankie Furbert, a former Harbour Light client, said the public should support the kite-making programme and other Salvation Army projects.

Mr Furbert, a former heroin addict who now works at Harbour Light, added he was proof that Harbour Light’s programmes work.

He said: “That’s one of the things that keeps me here, so guys can see exactly what this programme can do for them. I am a living testimony.”

Mr Furbert, who beat his addiction more than 17 years ago, added: “It’s all for a good cause because it is all to help guys with their recovery.

“This is a charity and most of the money comes through donation. It’s all about their recovery, about them learning different skills and getting back what they lost through drug or alcohol use.”

Mr Furbert completed eight months at Harbour Light in 2002, followed by 18 months in the Salvation Army’s Life Skills programme and later attended college.

He said he enjoyed seeing Harbour Light clients develop their skills.

Mr Furbert added: “The guys do an awesome job making the kites. They surpassed themselves this year with the amount of kites and the designs that they have made.

“It always makes me smile when I see it come to fruition.”

Mr Furbert said the kite-making programme gave those taking part “a safe space in their minds” and that they were also able to build friendships and work as a team.

He added: “This helps them a lot. We have clients who haven’t made a kite in years because of their addiction and being on the street.

“During this programme, it brings back childhood memories, memories of when things were going great. The therapy part of it is very important.”

Six men were involved in this year’s kite-making project, which will end next week.

They were assisted by the Prison Farm, which cut the sticks for the kites, and members of the Salvation Army’s Life skills programme.

Ms Fox said the group had made 87 kites out of a planned total of 100. She added one man had made more than 40 kites over the last four weeks.

Kites for adults, girls and boys are available in a variety of designs, sizes and colours are available.

Ms Fox said people can visit Harbour Light, on King Street in Hamilton, to buy ready-made kites or make special requests by phone or in person.

The cost of the kites range from $25 to $45.

Ms Fox said the kite-makers would be awarded prizes in several categories for their work.

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Published Apr 11, 2019 at 8:00 am (Updated Apr 11, 2019 at 7:22 am)

Harbour Light gets in the mood for Good Friday

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