Special Mass for Sri Lanka terror victims

  • A packed St Theresa’s Cathedral (Photograph by Owain Johnston-Barnes)

    A packed St Theresa’s Cathedral (Photograph by Owain Johnston-Barnes)

  • Call for unity: John Rankin, the Governor (File photograph by Akil Simmons)

    Call for unity: John Rankin, the Governor (File photograph by Akil Simmons)


Hundreds of people came together at St Theresa’s Cathedral yesterday to mourn those lost in the Easter Day terrorist attacks in Sri Lanka.

John Rankin, the Governor, addressed the congregation at a special Mass held at the Pembroke church, greeting the worshippers briefly in Sinhalese and Tamil.

Mr Rankin was shocked by the violence in the South Asian island where he served for four years as British High Commissioner.

He said: “I was there after 30 years of intercommunal conflict had ended, and in a period which while still often very difficult, brought hopes of peace and reconciliation between the different communities on the island.

“To see the terrible violence that broke out on Easter Sunday was a shock to me, and I can only imagine was a far deeper for those who were born and brought up in the beautiful island of Sri Lanka and who have friends and family who may have been caught up in the events.

Mr Rankin said one of the women who he worked with in Sri Lanka had recently given birth to a son and, in the wake of the attack, had expressed her concerns for the future.

He said: “She e-mailed me last week to say that she had hoped he was born to a changing Sri Lanka, but she was worried now that it may no longer be the case.

“But I think there’s hope. I know that those who carried out the attacks were not representative of most of the Muslim community of Sri Lanka, or indeed of most Sri Lankans.

“Our hope must be that all of those who were responsible for the attacks are dealt with as according to the law and that there are no reprisals or escalations of violence.

He added: “The events in Sri Lanka and the events last month in New Zealand show that we live in troubled times, but my firm belief is that we are all one child under God and that there is more that can unite us then can divide us — in Bermuda, in Sri Lanka and around the world.”

At least 250 people were killed and more than 500 injured in Sri Lanka on Easter Day in suicide bombings at three Christian churches and three hotels.

You must be registered or signed-in to post comment or to vote.

Published Apr 29, 2019 at 8:00 am (Updated Apr 29, 2019 at 7:06 am)

Special Mass for Sri Lanka terror victims

What you
Need to
Know
1. For a smooth experience with our commenting system we recommend that you use Internet Explorer 10 or higher, Firefox or Chrome Browsers. Additionally please clear both your browser's cache and cookies - How do I clear my cache and cookies?
2. Please respect the use of this community forum and its users.
3. Any poster that insults, threatens or verbally abuses another member, uses defamatory language, or deliberately disrupts discussions will be banned.
4. Users who violate the Terms of Service or any commenting rules will be banned.
5. Please stay on topic. "Trolling" to incite emotional responses and disrupt conversations will be deleted.
6. To understand further what is and isn't allowed and the actions we may take, please read our Terms of Service
7. To report breaches of the Terms of Service use the flag icon

  • Take Our Poll

    • "What is the most significant reason for Bermuda residents choosing to leave the island?"
    • Too small
    • 3%
    • Different way of life
    • 4%
    • Cost of living
    • 77%
    • Gang activity and general crime
    • 3%
    • Jobs/professional advancement
    • 8%
    • Education
    • 2%
    • Attitudes towards gays
    • 3%
    • Total Votes: 5235
    • Poll Archive

    Today's Obituaries

    eMoo Posts