Pop Art adds some colour to City Hall

  • Choice art: Pop Art and Its Influence exhibition, currently on at the Bermuda National Gallery, marks the second collaboration between the BNG and the Green Family. On view is Andy Warhol’s 1962 Campbell’s Soup Cans. (Photograph by Akil Simmons).

    Choice art: Pop Art and Its Influence exhibition, currently on at the Bermuda National Gallery, marks the second collaboration between the BNG and the Green Family. On view is Andy Warhol’s 1962 Campbell’s Soup Cans. (Photograph by Akil Simmons).

  • Toy story: KAWS’ Pinocchio and Cricket, 2010, can be seen at the new Pop Art and Its Influence exhibition at the BNG (Photograph by Akil Simmons).

    Toy story: KAWS’ Pinocchio and Cricket, 2010, can be seen at the new Pop Art and Its Influence exhibition at the BNG (Photograph by Akil Simmons).

  • What’s Poppin: the rather colourful Speedy Graphito’s Le Grand Bain, 2016, makes an appearance at the Pop Art and Its Influence exhibition, currently on display at the Bermuda National Gallery (Photograph by Akil Simmons).

    What’s Poppin: the rather colourful Speedy Graphito’s Le Grand Bain, 2016, makes an appearance at the Pop Art and Its Influence exhibition, currently on display at the Bermuda National Gallery (Photograph by Akil Simmons).


Icons of the 1960s pop art movement are on show in Hamilton.

The exhibition at the Bermuda National Gallery at Hamilton City Hall includes work by Andy Warhol, credited as the main inventor of the genre that blurred the line between mass culture and art.

Andy Warhol’s classic Campbell’s Soup Cans are on show, along with social commentary from the British graffiti artist Banksy.

The show, part of a collaboration with the Green family, owners of the Hamilton Princess, has been seen by more than 1,000 public school pupils so far.

The exhibition includes work that features famous cartoon characters such as Donald Duck, as well as other images from the commercial world.

The show, called What’s Poppin!, also includes Japanese artist Takashi Murakami’s rendition of the Louis Vuitton leather goods logo as abstract patterns.

The show is tied in with the public school art curriculum, which includes both Warhol and printmaking.

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Published Jan 15, 2020 at 8:00 am (Updated Jan 15, 2020 at 7:59 am)

Pop Art adds some colour to City Hall

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