Minors eager to make his mark on world stage

  • Proudest moment: Dage Minors, who is running the 800 and 1,500 metres in Lima, became the first Bermudian to win the Front Street Mile elite men’s race last year

    Proudest moment: Dage Minors, who is running the 800 and 1,500 metres in Lima, became the first Bermudian to win the Front Street Mile elite men’s race last year


Dage Minors is determined to show he belongs on the international stage when he competes in his first major competition at the Pan American Games.

Minors missed the Commonwealth Games on the Gold Coast, Queensland, last year because of university commitments and is eager to test himself against the region’s top middle-distance runners.

The 23-year-old, who will compete in the 1,500 metres final tomorrow and the 800 semi-finals on Friday, is hoping to gain valuable experience in Lima in his pursuit of continuous improvement.

“My expectations for these Games are to show that I belong here and can compete,” said Minors, whose personal best is 3min 48.03sec in the 1,500 and 1:47.09 in the 800.

“I’ve found that when we get caught up only on results we forget why we started something. This is valuable in sport and in life.

“Focusing more on the process and getting better everyday is what I aim to do until I can’t any more.”

Minors warmed up for the Pan Am Games by competing at the University Games in Naples, Italy, last month, placing ninth in the 1,500 semi-finals in 3:54.60 and seventh in the 800 semi-finals in 1:51.43.

“My preparations for Pan Am have been good,” he said. “I was back in Bermuda for close to a month and it was great to be there just to train and be with the family.

“It gave me a push to see that a lot of people support me and root for me.”

Expecting the unexpected will be Minors’s mantra before he takes his place on the starting line at the National Athletics Stadium at the Vedina Sports Complex. He hopes it will be the first of several appearances at major multi-sports competitions.

“At championship meets you never know how things will play out,” he said. “Sometimes the races are fast, but more often they are tactical affairs. I can’t say the goal is to PB [personal best] because it may not be a race set up for that.

“I’d love to compete at all the top meets and hope to gain valuable experience and push on at these Games. My athletic goals are simple: continue to train hard and push myself mentally and physically.”

Minors, who has a major in sports and recreation management, will return to Franklin Pierce University in New Hampshire in the autumn to coach and train on Optional Practical Training. An OPT offers international students who have completed one full year of academic study in the United States to accumulate paid work experience in their chosen field.

“This year has been a big learning curve for me as I’ve moved on from the college system,” added Minors, who became the first Bermudian to win the Front Street Mile elite men’s race last year. “Also, I’ve been transitioning more to the 1,500 and mile events.

“I’ve had a lot of good things happen in my career but the one that sticks out the most is winning the Front Street Mile. I’ve run faster before and beat better people but the significance is what makes it a highlight.”

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Published Aug 7, 2019 at 8:00 am (Updated Aug 6, 2019 at 11:12 pm)

Minors eager to make his mark on world stage

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