Baby joy as parents welcome second ‘miracle twin’

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  • (Photograph courtesy of IWK Health Centre, Halifax, Nova Scotia)

Bermudian couple Edonna and Ryan Bean pictured in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit with their son Emyr, who was born on  November 25. On Tuesday, eight days later,  Ms Bean gave birth to Emyr's twin brother Esai.i

    (Photograph courtesy of IWK Health Centre, Halifax, Nova Scotia) Bermudian couple Edonna and Ryan Bean pictured in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit with their son Emyr, who was born on November 25. On Tuesday, eight days later, Ms Bean gave birth to Emyr's twin brother Esai.i

  • Photograph by Ryan Bean

First twin Emyr holds  his mother's finger.

    Photograph by Ryan Bean First twin Emyr holds his mother's finger.


A Bermudian couple have spoken of their joy and relief at the arrival of their second son, eight days after the historic interval birth of his twin.

Both babies are three months’ premature but are doing well in a neonatal intensive care unit.

Esai Fredrick Ethan Nayr Bean was born on Tuesday after doctors became concerned about a suspected infection Edonna Bean had contracted after giving birth to the first twin, Emyr, on November 25. They recommended an emergency c-section under general anaesthetic.

“Everything happened so fast,” said Ms Bean.

The unexpected turn of events meant husband Ryan was unable to be by her side at the birth, as he had returned to Bermuda on Sunday following Emyr’s arrival last month.

However, he anxiously stayed in touch by phone, receiving updates on the birth at the IWK Health Centre in Halifax, Nova Scotia.

Esai arrived at 10.48am, weighing 2lb 7oz, at 27 weeks and two days.

The record-setting twins — a first for the hospital — are now lying in adjacent incubators.

“Esai looks exactly like Emyr even though they are not identical twins, they present similar mannerisms. It’s amazing,” said Ms Bean from her hospital bed last night.

“The twins are in incubators side-by-side and the nurses have them facing each other. They both are so settled as if they sense each others presence.”

She recalled how she began to experience abdominal pain earlier this week, just days after Emyr’s birth. Her body temperature went up and there were concerns for the well-being of the second twin.

After “lots of blood tests” she said the beginning stages of an infection was suspected. That’s when doctors recommended a c-section.

“They thought it best I have an emergency c-section because of the symptoms I was displaying. They suspected a hidden infection from keeping the placenta of Emyr inside of me. I started to display symptoms of an infection less than 24 hours after I stopped taking antibiotics,” said Ms Bean.

“I was very nervous initially because I thought it was too soon for Esai to deliver. But after speaking with my doctor, she calmed me down and helped me to see the whole picture. She explained to me that it was actually beneficial for him to come now instead of catching my infection.

“Now that it’s over, I absolutely agree. I’m honestly speechless when I look at these two children to know just weeks ago their future looked so grim and now they’re here and thriving.”

Mr Bean had arrived back in Bermuda on Sunday with plans to return to Halifax on December 17. He became concerned when he received an early morning call on Tuesday.

“She [Edonna] told me that she was feeling things that resembled contractions. I got nervous instantly and said to myself ‘man, he’s coming already’. So then I tried to calm her down while thinking it can’t be contractions,” said Mr Bean.

“But soon I was told that she was going to the birthing unit. I just said to her to relax and let God take control, what will be will be.

“I heard from the social worker at about 10.20am that she was going into the operating room. Soon after that I got a call saying I have another son and that he was doing fine. I was just so appreciative of the four or five calls from the social worker with constant updates.”

At last check last night, both twins were doing fine.

Ms Bean said: “They’re both blowing the doctors’ minds, and Esai is not on a ventilator. Emyr still is, but he has been upgraded to a conventional ventilator which makes him work a bit more on his own. And they are both receiving donor breast milk and drinking more than expected.

“Esai looks bigger than his brother and he’s not as red, but he still has no pigmentation like Emyr — he’s literally double the size of his twin. And Emyr has gained 2oz in the last 24 hours.”

Still a bit sore, but otherwise in great spirits, she said she was more than well knowing both twins are progressing well.

“It’s amazing how peaceful they are being next to one another.”

She has been flooded with calls from well-wishers in addition to Canadian and international media representatives to share her family’s story on their historical interval births.

According to the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, in 1998, delayed interval births are very rare, and the believed record gap between the birth of surviving twins was 93 days.

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Published Dec 5, 2013 at 8:00 am (Updated Dec 4, 2013 at 11:31 pm)

Baby joy as parents welcome second ‘miracle twin’

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