Men deny murder charges in court

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Two men denied separate murder charges at the Supreme Court arraignments session yesterday.

Khyri Smith-Williams, from Sandys, pleaded not guilty to the murder of Colford Ferguson, who was fatally shot on February 4, 2011.

The 27-year-old also denied using a firearm to commit the offence.

Mr Ferguson, a 29-year-old father of one, was shot while doing construction work on a house at the junction of East Shore Road and Somerset Road in Sandys.

Mr Smith-Williams was remanded in custody for a further appearance.

Former Bermuda footballer Rakeem DeShields, 25, denied the unlawful killing of Dijon Simmons in an incident on March 18 this year.

Mr Simmons, a bartender, died in King Edward VII Memorial Hospital days after being involved in a fight on Front Street.

Mr DeShields, from Paget, was released on bail until the next arraignments session on July 2.

A 53-year-old Pembroke man, who cannot be named for legal reasons, denied two counts of sexual exploitation of a young girl aged under 14 while in a position of trust.

He also pleaded not guilty to a charge of unlawful carnal knowledge involving the same girl.

All three offences are alleged to have happened on an unknown date between June 15, 1997 and June 15, 1998.

The defendant was released on bail for a further appearance later this month.

Edward Albouy, from Southampton, denied a series of drug and money-laundering charges.

The 24-year-old pleaded not guilty to the importation of 2,956.8 grams of ecstasy, 1,643.4 grams of cannabis and 12,095 grams of cannabis resin on September 3 last year.

He also denied charges of possessing the drugs with intent to supply and two counts of money laundering.

He was released on bail and is expected to return to the court on June 8.

Anthony Williams, 20, denied breaking into a Friswells Road home with a knife on April 8.

Mr Williams, of Sandys, was ordered to make a further appearance on June 15.

It is The Royal Gazette’s policy not to allow comments on stories regarding criminal court cases. This is to prevent any statements being published that may jeopardise the outcome of that case.

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