Modellers estimate $200m-$400m in insured losses from Gonzalo

  • An aerial photograph of a storm-battered Bermuda, taken following Hurricane Gonzalo from a Lynx helicopter attached to HMS Argyll which was deployed to assist with recovery efforts.

    An aerial photograph of a storm-battered Bermuda, taken following Hurricane Gonzalo from a Lynx helicopter attached to HMS Argyll which was deployed to assist with recovery efforts.


Catastrophe modelling firm AIR Worldwide estimates that insured losses in Bermuda from Hurricane Gonzalo will range between $200 million and $400 million.

AIR conducted a damage survey across Bermuda on Sunday and Monday. In a statement, AIR said: “In the areas surveyed, damage was mostly limited to roofs but structural damage was seen on older buildings, including some historical ones.

“Most resorts on the Island withstood the storm very well, sustaining only minor roof damage to one or two units that were more directly exposed to high winds.

“Some roof damage caused by Tropical Storm Fay a week earlier was still under repair when Hurricane Gonzalo struck. Roof damage ranged from superficial, with just a few tiles removed, to severe — although in most cases, the interiors were not breached.

“Less common, but still seen in several areas, was heavier damage to older buildings or to buildings that were less well maintained or not subject to strict building codes (such as warehouses or garages).”

AIR said Gonzalo’s eye was “very large” with a diameter of 30 miles, leading to about 90 minutes of eerie calm as it passed directly over the Island.

Scott Stransky, manager and principal scientist at AIR Worldwide, said: “When the eye began to come onshore, the storm was still a Category 3 hurricane with 115mph sustained winds. However, by the time the centre passed overhead, Gonzalo had weakened to a Category 2 hurricane, with 110mph sustained winds.

“The strongest observed winds at Bermuda International Airport were 93mph sustained, with gusts of 113mph. The storm weakened prior to landfall due to both lower sea surface temperatures and higher wind shear in the vicinity of Bermuda.

“Note that the centre of Tropical Storm Fay passed directly over the Island less than a week ago. It is likely that Fay’s passage reduced the sea surface temperatures around Bermuda, allowing Gonzalo to be just slightly weaker than it might have been otherwise.”

AIR said most of the newer and well-maintained buildings that meet Bermuda’s building codes stood up well to Gonzalo’s winds, with only minor damage to roof areas that were directly exposed to the oncoming storm.

“Gonzalo’s track may have also mitigated the damage in Bermuda,” AIR added. “Building damage from winds is due to both wind speed and duration. Thus, the damage caused by Gonzalo was not as bad as it potentially could have been because Gonzalo’s eye (the calm of the storm) enveloped the entire territory as it passed directly overhead, thereby reducing the amount of time buildings were exposed to heavy winds.”

AIR’s estimation includes damage to onshore property and business interruption, but does not include damage to boats.

The estimated damage tally compares to Fabian-related losses of $300 million (in 2003 dollars); AIR estimates that a recurrence of Fabian today — with today’s exposures — would result in insured losses of around $650 million.

You must be registered or signed-in to post comment or to vote.

Published Oct 22, 2014 at 4:21 pm (Updated Oct 22, 2014 at 5:53 pm)

Modellers estimate $200m-$400m in insured losses from Gonzalo

What you
Need to
Know
1. For a smooth experience with our commenting system we recommend that you use Internet Explorer 10 or higher, Firefox or Chrome Browsers. Additionally please clear both your browser's cache and cookies - How do I clear my cache and cookies?
2. Please respect the use of this community forum and its users.
3. Any poster that insults, threatens or verbally abuses another member, uses defamatory language, or deliberately disrupts discussions will be banned.
4. Users who violate the Terms of Service or any commenting rules will be banned.
5. Please stay on topic. "Trolling" to incite emotional responses and disrupt conversations will be deleted.
6. To understand further what is and isn't allowed and the actions we may take, please read our Terms of Service
7. To report breaches of the Terms of Service use the flag icon

  • Take Our Poll

    • "What are your views on anonymous online commenting (trolling)?"
    • Helpful to our democracy and needs to continue
    • 25%
    • Hurtful to our democracy and needs to end
    • 59%
    • Limits the number of people willing to give public service
    • 10%
    • An important tool for political parties
    • 6%
    • Total Votes: 4508
    • Poll Archive

    Today's Obituaries

    eMoo Posts