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Farewell to Cuba’s brutal Big Brother

One of the most brutal dictators in modern history has died. Oddly enough, some will mourn his passing, and many an obituary will praise him. Millions of Cubans who have been waiting impatiently for this moment for more than half a century will simply ponder his crimes and recall the pain and suffering he caused. Why this discrepancy? Because deceit was one of Fidel Castro's greatest talents, and gullibility is one of the world's greatest frailties. A genius at mythmaking, Castro relied on the human thirst for myths and heroes. His lies were beautiful, and so appealing.

According to Castro and to his propagandists, the so-called revolution was not about creating a repressive totalitarian state and securing his rule as an absolute monarch, but rather about eliminating illiteracy, poverty, racism, class differences and every other ill known to humankind.

This bold lie became believable, thanks largely to Castro's incessant boasting about free schools and medical care, which made his myth of the benevolent utopian revolution irresistible to many of the world's poor.

Many intellectuals, journalists and educated people in the First World fell for this myth, too — although they would have been among the first to be jailed or killed by Castro in his own realm — and their assumptions acquired an intensity similar to that of religious convictions.

Pointing out to such believers that Castro imprisoned, tortured and murdered thousands more of his own people than any other Latin American dictator was usually futile. His well-documented cruelty made little difference, even when acknowledged, for he was judged according to some aberrant ethical code that defied logic.

This Kafkaesque moral disequilibrium had a touch of magical realism, for sure, as outrageously implausible as anything that Castro's close friend Gabriel García Márquez could dream up. For instance, in 1998, at about the same time that Chile's ruler, Augusto Pinochet, was arrested in London for his crimes against humanity, Cuba's self-anointed “maximum leader” visited Spain with ample fanfare, unmolested, even though his human rights abuses dwarfed those of Pinochet.

Even worse, whenever Castro travelled abroad, many swooned in his presence. In 1995, when he visited New York to speak at the United Nations, many of the leading lights of that city jostled so intently for a chance to meet with him at media mogul Mort Zuckerman's triplex penthouse on Fifth Avenue that Time magazine declared “Fidel Takes Manhattan!” Not to be outdone, Newsweek called Castro “The Hottest Ticket in Manhattan”. None of the American elites who hobnobbed with Castro that day seemed to care that he had put nuclear weapons to their heads in 1962.

If this were a just world, 13 facts would be etched on Castro's tombstone and highlighted in every obituary, as bullet points — a fitting metaphor for someone who used firing squads to murder thousands of his own people.

• He turned Cuba into a colony of the Soviet Union and nearly caused a nuclear holocaust

• He sponsored terrorism wherever he could and allied himself with many of the worst dictators on Earth

• He was responsible for so many thousands of executions and disappearances in Cuba that the precise number of them is hard to reckon

• He brooked no dissent and built concentration camps and prisons at an unprecedented rate, filling them to capacity, incarcerating a higher percentage of his own people than most other modern dictators, including Stalin

• He condoned and encouraged torture and extrajudicial killings

• He forced nearly 20 per cent of his people into exile, and prompted thousands to meet their deaths at sea, unseen and uncounted, while fleeing from him in crude vessels

• He claimed all property for himself and his henchmen, strangled food production and impoverished the vast majority of his people

• He outlawed private enterprise and labour unions, wiped out Cuba's large middle class and turned Cubans into slaves of the state

• He persecuted gay people and tried to eradicate religion

• He censored all means of expression and communication

• He established a fraudulent school system that provided indoctrination rather than education, and created a two-tier healthcare system, with inferior medical care for the majority of Cubans and superior care for himself and his oligarchy, and then claimed that all his repressive measures were absolutely necessary to ensure the survival of these two ostensibly “free” social welfare projects

• He turned Cuba into a labyrinth of ruins and established an apartheid society in which millions of foreign visitors enjoyed rights and privileges forbidden to his people

• He never apologised for any of his crimes or stood trial for them

In sum, Fidel Castro was the spitting image of Big Brother in George Orwell's novel 1984. So, adiós, Big Brother, king of all Cuban nightmares. And may your successor, Little Brother, soon slide off the bloody throne bequeathed to him.

Carlos Eire is an author and the T. Lawrason Riggs Professor of History and Religious Studies at Yale University

In this 1999 file photograph, Cuba's leader Fidel Castro gestures at a speaking event after being bombarded with flashing cameras in Havana (Photograph by Jose Goitia/AP)

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Published November 28, 2016 at 8:00 am (Updated November 28, 2016 at 7:31 am)

Farewell to Cuba’s brutal Big Brother

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